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Posts Tagged ‘ Cabinteely House ’

Summer of Heritage 2014: Tours Of Dún Laoghaire Rathdown

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I am firmly into cultural brochure and leaflet mode to ensure that I don’t miss anything in my local area before September. I struck lucky with DLR County Council’s Summer of Heritage brochure. It lists no less than twenty tours you can take during the summer in the Dún Laoghaire Rathdown area. Plenty to keep you occupied during July and August with the bonus that all of the tours are free and all are suitable for children (with extra care needed in some properties). It’s also worth noting that you can take a tour of the Dalkey Castle and Heritage centre for free as part of this Summer Heritage series. These special tours are at 10.45 on Mondays and Thursdays until 4 September. You can browse the site after the tours and if you’ve never been to Dalkey Castle I would recommend this as a great opportunity to see this showpiece of Dalkey’s history. Perhaps unusually, the Castle and Heritage Centre have a Writer’s Gallery celebrating the diversity of the area’s talented writers, as well as the expected mediaeval artefacts and weaponry.

I’ve long meant to get around to visiting Cabinteely House and this summer I have finally managed it as part of the DLR Summer of Heritage. Guides run 60-minute tours every Wednesday and Saturday until 7 September. On tour days, there are four events beginning at 2pm, no booking required. We went along in good time to catch the first tour as it gave us the chance to have a look around the park first. Cabinteely Park was once part of the estate that belonged to the house’s successive owners. We have the former Dublin County Council’s determination to control planning to thank for having the ninety odd acres of beautiful parkland. The descendants of the last owner of Cabinteely house, Joseph McGrath were rather keen on building all over it, having previously sold off the contents of the house. Next to the main house, the old stables and a granary building have survived and now house an arts centre and a cafe. The cafe has outside seating that looks onto a Japanese garden established in the courtyard; it’s a lovely place to while away an hour or so. Continue reading

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