Advertisements

Posts Tagged ‘ Costumes Parisiens ’

Post-New Year’s Culture Vulturing: Looking Ahead In 2014

ngi

I know that we can find it a little hard to find inspiration to cope with January’s chills, but I’m trying for a brighter glow by looking ahead to cultural goings-on in early 2014. To begin with, I picked up a couple of event brochures from the National Gallery of Ireland and another one from the Chester Beatty Library plopped though my letterbox recently.

To take the latter venue first, the major exhibition of French fashion illustrations, Costumes Parisiens: Fashion Plates from 1912-1914 (mentioned previously) will continue to run until 30 March 2014. In conjunction with this exhibition, as part of the free talks programme there will be three fashion themed Thursday lunchtime (1.10pm) talks. The first one is by Irish costume designer Joan Bergin and is entitled ‘The Thrills and Spills of Costume Design for Film’ on 30 January. Deirdre McQuillan of the Irish Times follows this up on 6 February will a talk about the fact and fiction of the Arran sweater. As a child, I loved the Arran patterned sweater that my nan knitted for me so I will certainly try to get along to that talk. It might even inspire me to get knitting again and that really would be a New Year achievement. Continue reading

Advertisements

Dressed to Impress : French Fashion at the Chester Beatty Library

cbl

I have been once more touring the cultural hotspots in Dublin; putting myself through the hard grind of visiting exhibitions so that I can pass the results on to Irish News Review readers. It’s a dirty job, but someone’s got to do it; that’s what I tell myself anyway. However, as soon as I read Chester Beatty Library’s autumn programme, I have been looking forward to seeing the French fashion prints. I could try to claim that I have been visiting the Costumes Parisiens exhibition in an entirely selfless spirit, but I confess that just wouldn’t be true.

The bulk of the Costumes Parisiens display consists of over 100 fashion plates (I did try to keep a tally, but kept losing count) from the French fashion magazine, Journal des Dames et des Modes (1912 – 1914). Italian writer Tom Antongini (1877-1967) set up the journal in June 1912 and went on to publish three issues a month until the outbreak of the First World War. Antongini invited well-known artists and designers of the day, such as Léon Bakst and George Barbier to illustrate the periodical and so the Journal des Dames became much prized for its high quality illustrations. The fashion plates were made using a process requiring a great deal of skill, which involved the use of stencils (pochoir) to create the coloured parts of the scene.  Many years later, the colours and lines of the illustrations of fashionably clothed women are still exquisite.   Continue reading

Advertisements
Advertisements