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Posts Tagged ‘ Culture ’

Summer Of Culture At The Castle

Dublin Castle Summer Season 2014

This summer, Dublin Castle seems to be trying to be a one-stop cultural feast. The OPW site is as usual playing host to the sand sculptures exhibition but there’s lots more besides marvelling at Duthain Dealbh’s incredible sand creations. This year children will have the opportunity to build sculptures at the castle and win a prize into the bargain. Prizes will also be on offer for winners of the ‘Family Trail’ challenge on July weekends. Amidst all of the summer revelry, an event at the Chapel Royal commemorates the centenary of the beginning of World War I, ‘Music, poetry, songs and propaganda from both sides, this 50 minute drama will inform, move, surprise and perhaps even amuse’. The War of Words is at 7.30 pm on 28 July and tickets are €6 from Entertainment.ie. Continue reading

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Waterford Treasures: Exploring The Viking Triangle

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We went on a post-New Year trip to Waterford to keep off those January Blues that folks keep writing about (I’m not sure what a January Blue looks like but I’m keeping a sharp look out anyway). But to return to Waterford and its attractions. I want particularly to highlight the Waterford Museum of Treasures, which we visited over a couple of days. The museum actually comprises three different venues, situated nearby each other (being virtually next-door neighbours) in the district known as the Viking Triangle. Continue reading

Post-New Year’s Culture Vulturing: Looking Ahead In 2014

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I know that we can find it a little hard to find inspiration to cope with January’s chills, but I’m trying for a brighter glow by looking ahead to cultural goings-on in early 2014. To begin with, I picked up a couple of event brochures from the National Gallery of Ireland and another one from the Chester Beatty Library plopped though my letterbox recently.

To take the latter venue first, the major exhibition of French fashion illustrations, Costumes Parisiens: Fashion Plates from 1912-1914 (mentioned previously) will continue to run until 30 March 2014. In conjunction with this exhibition, as part of the free talks programme there will be three fashion themed Thursday lunchtime (1.10pm) talks. The first one is by Irish costume designer Joan Bergin and is entitled ‘The Thrills and Spills of Costume Design for Film’ on 30 January. Deirdre McQuillan of the Irish Times follows this up on 6 February will a talk about the fact and fiction of the Arran sweater. As a child, I loved the Arran patterned sweater that my nan knitted for me so I will certainly try to get along to that talk. It might even inspire me to get knitting again and that really would be a New Year achievement. Continue reading

National Gallery Of Ireland Plays Host To Festive Events

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This December, the National Gallery of Ireland presents a programme of free seasonal family events, accompanied by an exhibition of recently acquired portraits. Next year marks the 150th anniversary of the National Gallery, so make a date for the annual Turner exhibition, which opens on 1 January for one month only, followed by Care of the Collection (opens 18 January) and From the Archives: The Story of the National Gallery of Ireland (opens 30 January). Family Packs, Children’s Audio Guides and Anniversary Trails are free from the Information Desk in the Millennium Wing. Admission is free to all exhibitions and Christmas events. Continue reading

News in Brief : Backhanders And Blackouts

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NIB is sure we’ve covered this before, but hey, Irish women are the best looking in the world and that’s cause for celebration (drink based traditionally). The ranks made up by a dating site, aptly called BeautifulPeople.com weren’t so positive about Irish men though, ranking them third ugliest on the planet. It’s a small positive though as a few years ago they were ranked the ugliest. Sorry lads.

Talking of beautiful Irish things, we’re going to start selling off our heritage sites to the highest bidder. In yet another example of the Government trying to claw back the cash they splurged on champagne and caviar, they are now going to lease out sites like Dublin and Kilkenny Castles, Derrynane House and Doneraile Wildlife Park to the most persuasive tender. Apparently the rules are that any new commercial usage plans must be in check with the historical heritage of the site so no casinos or hotels will be permitted, unless the brown envelope’s thick enough. Minister for Public Service Reform Brian Hayes said: ‘I don’t know how successful it’s going to be, I have to be very frank.’ Continue reading

A Farm In The City: Airfield Re-Opens For Business

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Much to the delight of South Dubliners (especially the littlest ones) the news of the phased reopening of Airfield Farm and Gardens in Dundrum has recently been announced. As regulars will know, Airfield has been closed for extensive renovations for the last two years, though it has seemed like much longer to us locals. The phased post-renovation opening is because all of the necessary work isn’t yet complete. At the moment part of the estate is open for business, approached from Overend Way, along with the new ergonomically designed restaurant. Airfield House, no longer used as a cafe, now contains a Heritage Experience, taking full advantage of the extensive archive left to Airfield Trust by the Overend sisters, Naomi and Letitia. The charitable trust was set up by the sisters in 1974 to benefit the local area in perpetuity.

The house was open for the first time on Wednesday 30th October for self-guided tours, just in time for a holiday activity. The house had been decorated with pumpkins (although whether the Overend sisters ever had pumpkin decorations is another matter) and looked rather jolly and inviting. Only the ground floor is open but it has been restored and furnished to display artefacts illustrating Overend family, community and social life. There is a fascinating collection of photographs, letters and documents showing how Trevor and Lily Overend developed the farm from an existing house and began to supply produce to the local area. Their daughters Naomi and Letitia continued and developed the farming tradition. The exhibition brings Airfield history up to date (and aptly demonstrates the Overend legacy) with an interactive display where visitors can view footage put together from the farm’s many schools activities. You’ll probably find as I did that you spot people you know, showing just how much a part of the community Airfield remains.   Continue reading

First Flight Fest Now History Fest (26 Sept – 9 Oct)

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Despite the summer having slipped quietly away, there’s still plenty of festival and cultural activity to be had around the city. Coming up at the end of September is Dublin’s first history festival which promises to be a worthy member of the cultural scene. This is an exciting new initiative from Dublin City Council so any history buffs out there would be advised to check out what’s on offer.

Much of the programme is free of charge but booking will be necessary for most events. Some are simply ‘first come first served’ but it’s as well to check the details. Events have been scheduled for Dublin City Libraries, Dublin Castle (Printworks Venue), City Hall and the Irish Film Institute so check the web site for further information. I’ve certainly got my eye on booking a few events, though deciding which ones to choose will be a tricky task. It’s not often that you get to see the likes of Jung Chang and Simon Schama for free. Continue reading

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