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Posts Tagged ‘ farming ’

News in Brief-Unionist Lashes Out At Eastenders GAA Jersey

eastenders

Is anyone else starting to think a bit of timely hacking now, might clear up this whole GSOC surveillance mess that continues to dominate the press? Be warned readers, while we are being told to look away by Alan Shatter, something much more sinister is going on elsewhere.

Such as the hike in cabbage prices. It’s true. Apparently ‘St. Patrick’s Day revellers are set to be hit by a cabbage shortage and escalating prices ahead of the annual festivities’ according to IrishCentral.com. Can you imagine? Paddy’s day without any cabbage, what will we – wait. How much cabbage do you normally eat on March 17th? NIB would guess not much, eating is cheating after all and Paddy’s day is New Year’s Eve mark 2. It’s the weather anyway that’s to blame apparently, cabbages have been particularly hit by the cold snap, not to mention they’re floating through Cork at the moment. Continue reading

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Would Irish Emigrants Consider America’s Most Dangerous Jobs?

10-dangerous-jobs

Many Irish emigrants have ventured across the Atlantic to America in recent years due to the economic downturn. Many have sought fun loving jobs that simply allow them to get by while others who have since earned the right to remain in America have sought more advanced careers. Many Irish emigrants would like to land a job, but would they love these jobs to, literally, die for? Check out America’s most dangerous jobs in this infographic based on the 2012 National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries.

Not surprisingly, the list is dominated by blue-collar occupations that involve manual labour in high-risk work environments such as construction sites, factories and harsh outdoors.  After years at the top, fishing gave  way to logging as the most dangerous job. Felling and cutting trees into logs has never been more dangerous than in 2012.

One other interesting fact is that incidents involving some means of transportation topped the causes of fatal work injuries. It accounts for nearly half at 41%, more than double the second most common cause, which is homicide and violence at 17%. There was  a 3.3% increase in motor vehicle crashes last year compared to 2011, and it’s the first time in eight years that such an increase was noted.

This list of America’s ten deadliest jobs would hardly surprise anyone. After all, they truly have harsh environments to begin with. Falling trees, molten hot iron, high altitude, and the open sea create conditions conducive to fatal work injury. Media outfits like Discovery Channel and National Geographic know how shocking work conditions can be, and how much people would like to know. The TV shows that focus on some of these dangerous occupations have built quite a following over the recent years.

Surprisingly, firefighting and police work, two jobs with extremely hazardous environments are not on the list proving that with enough safety measures and foresight even America’s ten deadliest jobs can be less deadly after all.

Payout is good but would you apply for any jobs mentioned in this infographic?

Content and infographic courtesy of FinancesOnline.com

A Farm In The City: Airfield Re-Opens For Business

airfield

Much to the delight of South Dubliners (especially the littlest ones) the news of the phased reopening of Airfield Farm and Gardens in Dundrum has recently been announced. As regulars will know, Airfield has been closed for extensive renovations for the last two years, though it has seemed like much longer to us locals. The phased post-renovation opening is because all of the necessary work isn’t yet complete. At the moment part of the estate is open for business, approached from Overend Way, along with the new ergonomically designed restaurant. Airfield House, no longer used as a cafe, now contains a Heritage Experience, taking full advantage of the extensive archive left to Airfield Trust by the Overend sisters, Naomi and Letitia. The charitable trust was set up by the sisters in 1974 to benefit the local area in perpetuity.

The house was open for the first time on Wednesday 30th October for self-guided tours, just in time for a holiday activity. The house had been decorated with pumpkins (although whether the Overend sisters ever had pumpkin decorations is another matter) and looked rather jolly and inviting. Only the ground floor is open but it has been restored and furnished to display artefacts illustrating Overend family, community and social life. There is a fascinating collection of photographs, letters and documents showing how Trevor and Lily Overend developed the farm from an existing house and began to supply produce to the local area. Their daughters Naomi and Letitia continued and developed the farming tradition. The exhibition brings Airfield history up to date (and aptly demonstrates the Overend legacy) with an interactive display where visitors can view footage put together from the farm’s many schools activities. You’ll probably find as I did that you spot people you know, showing just how much a part of the community Airfield remains.   Continue reading

Pilgrim Hill

“Plenty of people are on to the emptiness, but it takes real guts to see the hopelessness.”

So speaks John Givings, the lucid schizophrenic of Revolutionary Road. Jimmy, the farmer we encounter in Pilgrim Hill, would meet with John’s approval. As the forlorn hero of the piece, he shows real guts. Jimmy doesn’t speak like a hero, he doesn’t act like a hero, he doesn’t undergo a heroic transformation of character. But he does face the reality of his existence like a hero, seeing the hopelessness around him with perfect clarity, and it is this brave acceptance of his situation that renders him painfully sympathetic. Continue reading

Government Penny Pinching May Do More Harm Than Good

covBackbenchers from Fine Gael and Labour have warned of impending trouble within the coalition over the issue of means testing for third level grants. The Government has indicated that proposals regarding the inclusion of assets worth over €750,000 are still being discussed – meaning farms and business assets could now come under scrutiny when applying for education grants. The issue first reared its head last summer and has once more come to the fore this week. Education Minister Ruairi Quinn has argued previously that farmers and the self-employed are not averse to manipulating their incomes to ensure their children receive third level grants. Continue reading

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