Posts Tagged ‘ New Ross ’

The Ballance Sheet #7 : A Year In Review (2013)

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Wrapping up the year soon, folks, so I think a few words are in order about what’s gone down in 2013…

FAVOURITE MATCHES

Had two favourites this year: with ‘Fabulous’ Nicky at CCW Revolution, back in May, and with Stevie Xavier, at WrestleZone’s Aberdeen Anarchy show in June. Two great guys, two incredibly enjoyable matches, and two amazing crowds. Definitely hope I get the chance to work with both guys again, down the line.

My other more enjoyable matches this year were with Jordan Devlin, Bam Katraz, and BT Gunn, amongst others. It’s been a good year, and I’ve had the opportunity to work with some superb talent, and in front of some great audiences. Continue reading

The Kennedy Files : Timeline Of November 22nd,1963

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John Fitzgerald Kennedy, America’s first Irish-Catholic president, was a son of two families whose roots stretched back to Ireland.

The Fitzgerald family was from the rural County Limerick village of Bruff. Between 1846 and 1855, some of the Fitzgeralds migrated to America to escape the devastating potato famine. Thomas Fitzgerald, born in Bruff in 1823, and Rose Anna Cox, born in County Cavan in 1835, were the parents of John Francis Fitzgerald, who was born in Boston, Massachusetts, on February 11, 1863. Continue reading

Last Chance To See: The Ros Tapestry, Farmleigh, Dublin

Technically, this is not actually the last chance to see the Ros Tapestry, but as the tapestry is only at Farmleigh until 1st April, if you live nearer to Dublin than New Ross (its usual home) then you would do well to visit Farmleigh this weekend. The exhibition at Farmleigh also happens to be free, a welcome bonus in these cash strapped times.

Alongside our recent giant Easter egg hunt, which took in Ashtown and Farmleigh, we took time to pop in to view the Ros Tapestry panels. The panels have been exhibited in Farmleigh Gallery since January, to mark Ireland’s Presidency of the EU. The monumental series of fifteen panels measuring four feet by six is still a work in progress. Twelve panels are finished and the remaining three (including a lively and detailed battle scene) are represented in this exhibition by full sized colour cartoons. Continue reading

News in Brief-Uglier Than Jedward? New Set Of Twins Get The World Talking

#Twinning : The Second Coming Of The Mona Lisa

Enda Kenny has come under fire this week (what else is new) for “manipulating” his phone during an address from the Pope. A video uploaded to YouTube clearly shows the Taoiseach using his touch-screen phone during a papal audience at Castel Gandolfo in a shocking display of bad manners. Or maybe he was just trying to get through to the big man upstairs. That’s not all Enda has been up to this week.

Despite the rain the ploughing championshisp went down well in Wexford. The Rugby team made an appearance as did Ryan  Tubridy. And of course, the Taoiseach took time out to meet, greet and high-five some kids proving he is a man of the people. One man, in a field of people actually. Back in Dublin James Reilly ploughed on with his corruption.
Ah Minister Reilly. In recent weeks he’s been mentioned more than our favourite twins (who have been notably absent for a while*). There are another set of twins in the news though.

The Mona Lisa has a sister! An earlier version of da Vinci’s Mona Lisa has been unveiled meaning there are now two, almost identical paintings, depicting the is she/isn’t she smile. The new, older painting known as the Isleworth Mona Lisa is said to be a younger version of the famous face painted years previous.

Joe Mullins, a forensic specialist trained at the FBI, described how he had “age-regressed” the original Mona Lisa to determine what she would have looked like 11 to 12 years earlier in what can only be described as a CSI-like operation.
Joe, who describes himself as a “digital plastic surgeon”, gave the painting “a digital facelift and Botox” but still couldn’t turn that frown upside down. Oxford University art historian Martin Kemp (not of Spandau Ballet, shame) however, quashed the claims saying; “The head, like all other copies, does not capture the profound elusiveness of the original”. Or, fed up, to everyone else.

Rory McIlroy is selling his County Down estate – sorry if I don’t start weeping. The young golfer, currently in Chicago for the Ryder Cup tee off is selling up and shipping out of his £2 million mansion. According to reports the world number one, who incidentally is worth many millions in advertising alone, is looking at a move to Florida after deciding it doesn’t make “financial sense” to own a large home in Ireland.

What doesn’t make financial sense is the €1 million still outstanding from over payments to new teachers in 2011. 3000 teachers are yet to re-pay the governments unwitting bonus, presumably maths or economics aren’t their subjects.
Did you raise a glass to Arthur on Thursday or instead of a pint of the black stuff did you wish Diageo would get stuffed? While some legitimately questioned – given contemporary problems of society – how appropriate a day to celebrate alcohol was, frontman of The Walls, Steve Wall put it more bluntly and in slightly more colourful language. Writing on his Facebook page Walls said: “If anyone says Happy Arthur’s Day to me I’ll f***ing skull them.”

*If anyone sees our little Jedwards let me know.

JFK – The Irish Connection

This week the Late Late Show has reached somewhat of a wider audience than usual. Presenter Ryan Tubridy agreed to sit on the other side of the table as he appeared on NBC’s The Today Show. Tubridy made his appearance on the popular US morning show on Wednesday to promote his book ‘JFK in Ireland: Four Days That Changed a President.’ “I am going to talk about Ireland, my book, JFK, and perhaps use it as an opportunity to wear the green jersey and get people to return to Ireland like JFK did. I’m going to be banging the drum for Ireland,” Tubridy told the Irish Independent.

Released in 2010, the book examines Kennedy’s 1963 visit to Ireland, a visit JFK himself described as “the best four days of my life,” and his last visit to the country before his assassination five months later. Kennedy, who was America’s first Irish-Catholic President, was a member of two families with a rich history stretching back to Ireland. The Fitzgerald family was from Bruff in County Limerick and in the famine years emigrated to the New World to escape the most devastating effects. The first Irish-American Fitzgerald was born John Francis Fitzgerald in Boston on February 11th 1863. It was through this line JFK’s mother came from; Rose Elizabeth Fitzgerald, the daughter of John Francis and Mary Hannon of Acton, Massachusetts – herself of Irish descent. Meanwhile, another Irish family had also emigrated to America during the Great Famine; Patrick Kennedy left his home in Dunganstown, Co. Wexford and sailed for the States. There he married Bridget Murphy who would be eventually widowed and left to care for four sons, the youngest of whom was named Patrick Joseph, whose future grandson would become his country’s President.

Boston was the first port of settlement for both families, and became their home in this new country. They sought to take advantages of all the economic opportunities the US had to offer, although first they had to overcome a wave of discrimination against Irish-Catholic immigrants which was sweeping the country at that time. First they worked as peddlers and labourers, gradually moving up in the world to take positions as clerks and tavern owners. And, by the end of the 19th century, both of JFK’s grandfathers had become successful politicians in their own right; John Fitzgerald in particular served as Mayor of Boston and in the US Congress.

JFK was intensely proud of his Irish heritage and his family’s hardworking roots. During his visit to Ireland he remarked to the people of New Ross, Wexford – “When my great-grandfather left here to become a cooper in East Boston, he carried nothing with him except two things: a strong religious faith and a strong desire for liberty. I am glad to say that all of his great-grandchildren have valued that inheritance.”

The John F Kennedy library in Boston is a lasting reminder of the President’s link to the country of his ancestors. Amongst its treasures is a large Bible, brought over from Ireland by his great grandparents. An 1850 edition, it carries with it a record of the Fitzgerald family, including a marking of the birth of one John Fitzgerald Kennedy, born May 29th 1917, and was the Bible he placed one hand on when being sworn in as President of the United States almost 44 years later. Along with its other exhibits is a Waterford Crystal vase, etched into it is an Irish homestead, an immigrant ship followed by the White House, symbolising the journey of the Fitzgerald and Kennedy families.

During his four-day visit he made a stop at Limerick on the 29th of June. There he told the gathered crowd – “This is not the land of my birth, but it is the land for which I hold the greatest affection, and I certainly will come back in the springtime.” Five months later, Ireland’s only claim on an American President was dead, assassinated in Dallas while on a political trip to the state of Texas. The honour guard at his graveside in Arlington National Cemetery was the 37th Cadet Class of the Irish Army.

“I must say that though other days may not be so bright, as we look toward the future, that the brightest days will continue to be those we spent with you here in Ireland.”

-JFK, Eyre Square, Co. Galway, 29th June 1963