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Posts Tagged ‘ termination ’

No Record Of Abortion Request In Savita Case

Since the death of Savita Halapannavar following a miscarriage on the 28th October at University Hospital Galway her devastated husband Praveen has been fighting with the help of his solicitor Gerard O’Donnell to prevent a HSE inquiry into her death.

Speaking to the Irish Examiner Mr O’ Donnell confirmed that Mr Halapannavar’s legal team had requested that Savita’s medical records be handed over to her family and that any HSE copies be deleted immediately.

The solicitor said that it was his understanding, based on previous cases, that the HSE must comply with this request. Continuing Mr O Donnell warned that if the HSE failed to meet with this request that Mr Halapannavar’s entire legal team are fully prepared to file a complaint with the Data Protection Commissioner and if necessary obtain a High Court injunction to “restrain” any further access this particular group may gain to the files in question.

Mr O’Donnell then went on to criticise Taoiseach Enda Kenny for his comments on the case in which he said that widower Praveen should meet the chairman of the HSE’s inquiry “without prejudice” as this would be “in the interest of his own family’s tragedy.”

Given that it is his wish that any investigation into the death of his wife be fully independent Mr Halapannavar has already refused to cooperate with the HSE. Speaking on behalf of his client who wished to defend his decisions thus far Mr O’Donnell said “His wife died in the care of the HSE. He doesn’t think it’s appropriate nor does his family think it’s appropriate that the HSE should investigate it. They are the ones who are being investigated, so they should not investigate this.”

In what is perhaps a very surprising turn of events it was claimed, mere hours ago, by Mr O Donnell that having gained access to and studied closely Savita’s medical records that there is absolutely no mention of her or her husband’s repeated requests to have the fetus terminated after it was confirmed by hospital staff that Savita was in fact miscarrying and that the fetus would not survive.

The revelation came at the same time that it was announced that the HSE had asked the State’s health watchdog HIQA to initiate a statutory inquiry into the death of Savita Halapannavar. A move which may have been decided upon after an unprecedented intervention on the part of President Michael D Higgins who yesterday insisted that the inquiry into the woman’s death must meet the needs of her family as well as the state.

However, the director general designate of the HSE Tony O’Brien has since said that even if Mrs Halapannavar’s family decide not to cooperate with the HSE’s inquiry that it must still “be brought to a conclusion” It his belief that it would be “criminally negligent” to put an end to the HSE’s inquiry at this stage.

Mr O Brien claims that he requested the HIQA inquiry which may take place before the HSE’s inquiry concludes in order to give the family “further reassurance.” Only time will tell if this will in fact help to ease the worries of Mr Praveen Halapannavar and his family.

By Kerrie Mitchell

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Pregnant Woman Dies After Hospital Denies Termination

A pregnant woman has died in hospital following a miscarriage just days after being refused the abortion that may have saved her life.

By Kerrie Mitchell

Three separate investigations have been launched into the death of 31 year old married Indian woman, Savita Halappanavar, following her death in Galway University Hospital.

It is understood that Mrs Halappanavar who lived in Roscam, Co. Galway with her husband, 34 year old Praveen, an engineer employed by Boston Scientific, died on October 28th after contracting a severe case of blood poisoning.

Mrs Halappanavar was admitted to Galway University Hospital a week earlier complaining of intense back pain where it was quickly discovered that the woman, now 17 weeks pregnant, was in fact miscarrying. Her husband Praveen claims that despite repeated requests from both his wife and her family for a medical termination hospital officials refused to carry out the procedure because a foetal heartbeat could still be detected.

It has also been reported – by numerous sources – that when Mr Halappanavar questioned the hospitals refusal to carry out the abortion he was informed by officials that it was not allowed because Ireland is a “Catholic country.”

Although the procedure was delayed a further three days, Mrs Halappanavar did eventually undergo surgery to remove the remains of the fetus. Following this the woman subsequently developed septicemia (this occurs when bacteria enters the blood stream) an infection which proved to be fatal. At 1.10 a.m. on October 28 Mrs Halappanavar was pronounced dead.

Now, Mrs Halappanavars distraught family is said to be taking legal action against the hospital claiming that if the fetus had in fact been removed earlier the life of this woman, a beloved wife and daughter, could have been saved.

Three separate investigations are now being carried out by the coroner in Galway, the local hospital’s risk review group and the HSE’s National Incident Management Team.

A spokesperson for the Hospital has refused to comment saying that the hospital cannot under any circumstances discuss the details of an individual patient within the media.

Undoubtedly this tragic case will re-open the debate on abortion which is perhaps Ireland’s most controversial and divisive social, legal and medical issue.

Currently, Ireland’s position in relation to abortion is set out in the Constitution as follows “it is lawful to terminate a pregnancy in Ireland if it is established as a matter of probability that there is a real and substantial risk to the life, as distinct from the health, of the mother, which can only be avoided by a termination of the pregnancy.” This ruling also takes into account the mental health of the mother in question and the potential risk posed to her life which may arise from the threat of suicide.

Naturally this particular case will enrage pro-choice campaigners who will argue that this proves that abortions are not taking place in those cases where the mothers life is in fact at risk while pro-life campaigners will counter that matters are much more complex than this.

In what many reporters are dubbing a “terrible irony” this case comes just days after the Irish Government delayed revealing its stance on abortion. Health Minister Dr James Reilly was originally scheduled to report back to a European body by the end of October on the Government’s proposed actions following the ruling of the European Court Of Human Rights on the abortion regime in this country. Two years ago the Strasbourg Court criticised the Irish Government for leaving its own courts with a lack of clear information regarding lawful abortions. Dr Reilly now has just weeks to set out a plan to respond to the Courts ruling.

Over 1,000 people gathered outside Dàil Eireann last night in order to vent their fury at Ireland’s abortion stance following Savita’s death. Large crowds also assembled in Cork and other parts of the country to protest.

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